Hundreds of new pieces for strings

As part of the ‘Printed Music Strategic Acquisition Plan 2013/14 – 2018/19′, developed by our fantastic enquiries and printed music acquisitions Librarian, Oliver Witkin, the current display in the small library display cabinet highlights the fact that the library has recently been concentrating on boosting its collection of music for strings.

String players – Looking for some new repertoire?Violin wordcloud

Further to my colleague’s blog post,  I wanted to highlight the fact that the library has been purchasing lots of new music not only for violin, but also for viola, cello, double bass and guitar. I  noticed that during both the Summer and Autumn terms that I had been processing lots of shiny new music by composers such as Henze, Gubaidulina, Dallapiccola, Rautavaara, Schnittke, Penderecki and Ysaye to name but a few. There’s been so much more music coming through for the other instruments of the string family, and as a very rusty string player myself, I wanted to get the message out about all this great new music available in the Jerwood Library.

New Schott editions for strings

New Schott editions for strings (Cover images reproduced with permission from Schott Music Ltd.)

Cello wordcloudFor the current display, I wanted to highlight some of the new Schott Music editions we have recently acquired. They’re all available to borrow – just come and speak to a member of library staff if you’d like to borrow one. Also, don’t forget to keep an eye on our ‘New in the Jerwood Library‘ shelves  near the library issue desk where we display a taste of some of the new library stock.  Currently there’s a mixture of new printed music for strings, new books and new DVDs. You can also browse new music additions to the catalogue here.

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Changes to downloading Dawsonera e-books

An book held open by a model skull, surrounded by candles

This e-book change is happening at Halloween – let’s hope it’s not a bad omen!

From Tuesday 31 October 2017, Adobe Reader will no longer be used for downloaded Dawsonera e-books. Instead you must use the free Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) software (available for Windows, Mac, iOS and Android) or Bluefire Reader (available for Windows, iOS and Android).

This change resolves the problem with downloading e-books to iOS devices (iPads and iPhones).

Dawsonera have created a PDF guide to installing ADE on a Windows PC and their short video below demonstrates how to create an Adobe ID which allows you to open downloaded e-books on multiple devices (in both ADE and Bluefire Reader). Creating an Adobe ID is optional as you can choose to authorise your device without an ID. However this means the downloaded e-book will only work on the device you first downloaded it to. To access a downloaded title without an Adobe ID, please tick ‘I want to authorise my computer without an ID’ in the bottom left-hand corner of ADE when you are prompted to authorise your computer.

As the majority of e-books available from Trinity Laban libraries are provided by Dawsonera, ADE has been installed on all Trinity Laban PCs in preparation for this change.

We still recommend using the ‘read online’ feature instead of downloading e-books wherever possible as this is much more fully featured – for example, you can annotate the text or print/copy text from a limited number of pages.

However downloaded e-books can be read offline (once they’ve been downloaded and opened while you’re online) so can come in handy, for example to read on the move when you don’t have access to wifi or data.

Don’t be spooked (sorry) by these technical changes! Contact the Jerwood Library if you encounter any difficulties.

Update: Trinity Laban students and staff can download an updated guide to e-books from Moodle which covers multiple e-book suppliers.

Renewing items from the Jerwood Library

Picture of a library book's date label showing due date stamps

Photo credit: 140810-08 by waferboard, licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Got an email from the library reminding you your items are due back? Or, heaven forbid, that they are overdue and fines are building up?

Have no fear: watch our 90 second video (scroll down to ‘Jerwood Library Catalogue – renew my items on loan’) and discover how to renew your items instantly online via the Jerwood Library catalogue!

If you prefer written instructions:

  1. Log in with your usual username and password (same as Moodle)
  2. Click on My Account then Renew items on my card
  3. Tick the items to renew (or choose Renew all) then click Renew selected items
  4. Make a note of the new due date(s) on the next page. If an item cannot be renewed a message should explain why, and you’ll need to bring it in to the library to return it or renew it in person.

If you encounter any problems renewing your items, email the library or contact us on 020 8305 3951 / the web chat box on the catalogue (during library opening hours only). If you can’t log in at all, please try resetting your password before contacting us.

Feldman Audio DVDs – Complete Music for Piano and Strings

CD covers reproduced with permission. Original photography by Brian Slater.

The Jerwood Library has just acquired an excellent three-volume set of Morton Feldman’s complete music for piano and strings as performed by John Tilbury and the Smith Quartet, including Trinity Laban’s head of strings, Nic Pendlebury.

Released by Matchless Recordings, the set comes in the unusual format of audio DVDs, enabling the often enormous length of Feldman’s later works to be presented on a single disc.

The discs can be found shelved in the chamber music section of the library’s CDs, under CHA: FEL

New Music for Violin

We have recently added over 200 new items to the Jerwood Library’s collection of violin music; works by composers such as James Dillion, Philip Glass, Christian Wolff, Iannis Xenakis, Morton Feldman, Elliot Carter, Lou Harrison, Pierre Boulez, Luigi Nono, Oliver Knussen, David Matthews, Isang Yun, and Eugene Ysaye. There are also new additions from the classical and romantic repertoire, and a variety of anthologies, methods, studies, exercises and workbooks.

Some of the new additions to our violin section. Covers reproduced with permission from the publisher.

A regularly updated list of our most recent acquisitions can be found here (this page is regularly updated). Please also keep an eye out for new items displayed on the recent acquisitions shelves in the library.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me on 020 8330 3950 e-mail: o.witkin@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

Trinity Laban Faculty Composers: DARREN BLOOM

New work Five Brief Lessons to be premiered on Saturday 15th July at Cheltenham Music Festival – read on for more details.

The Jerwood Library’s twin display cabinets currently feature a display featuring Darren Bloom: composer, conductor, producer and educator.

Darren studied composition with Edwin Roxburgh, Brian Elias and Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, and conducting with Neil Thompson, Edwin Roxburgh and Christopher Austin. He was awarded a DipRAM and the Manson Fellowship from the Royal Academy of Music as well as recently being appointed an Associate of the RAM. In 2015 he commenced an AHRC funded PhD in Composition at the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Richard Causton.

In 2016 he won the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Prize and has been commissioned to write a new chamber work for the 2017 Cheltenham Festival

We are particularly fortunate to be able to include in this display materials lent by the composer revealing some of the processes behind his composition, including various stages of sketches, and pages of the very recently finished work for the Piatti Quartet, Five Brief Lessons, which will receive its premiere on Saturday 15th July at the Cheltenham Music Festival (more details here). The concert will be recorded for broadcast on BBC Radio3’s Hear and Now.

His recent chamber symphony Dr. Glaser’s Experiment was commissioned by the London Symphony Orchestra for their 2016 Futures Festival.
Darren’s chamber work Strange Attractors was selected by the UK panel of the International Society for Contemporary Music to represent the UK, and his chamber opera KETTLEHEAD was created as part of his second year of residence with the London Symphony Orchestra as a member of the LSO Soundhub Scheme.

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Darren Bloom working with the Composers’ Ensemble at Junior Trinity
Photo credit: Belinda Lawley

Darren is a founding member and conductor/creative producer of the Ossian Ensemble with whom he has given the premieres of dozens of new works over the past decade. Other conducting highlights include a performance of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies’ Five Klee Pictures in the presence of the composer, recording music for BBC4 documentaries, directing several youth new music ensembles, including the Composers Ensemble at Junior Trinity, and making his third annual appearance as a conductor for the LSO Soundhub Scheme.

Darren Bloom in the Jerwood Library collection:

Eve
by Darren Bloom
for soprano and chamber ensemble
Shelf mark: 782.99 BLO

Strange Attractors
by Darren Bloom
for piano, alto flute, bass clarinet, percussion, violin, violoncello
Shelf mark: 782.99 BLO

Dr Glaser’s Experiment
by Darren Bloom
for chamber orchestra
Shelf mark: 782.99 BLO

Under the twinkle of a fading star, we whisper together, part 1
by Darren Bloom
for violin, piano and sampler
Shelf mark: 782.99 BLO

CD: Tangled Pipes by Consortium5 featuring Consorts by Darren Bloom
NONCLASS008
Shelf mark: WOODWIND/CHAMBER: CON

Over 200 new DVDs added to the library!

The Jerwood Library has been fortunate to receive another very generous donation and this time, it’s DVDs from Billy Newman. Firstly, we checked through them all for duplicates, selling the few we found on to staff and students to raise some funds for the library. My colleague Helen then had the huge task of cataloguing all of the them so that when someone searches the catalogue, they’ll find them easily. To search only for DVDs, simply change the ‘type’ to ‘DVD’.

New DVDs

A selection of the new DVDs waiting to go out onto the library shelves

We’ve got a wide variety of genres on DVD; from masterclasses to films and from musicals to yoga. Many of the new DVDs are operas and what is great is that we’ve got maybe 3 or 4 different versions of the same opera. If you can’t find the opera you’re looking for, or you’re away for the summer, why not try using our online resource: Opera in Video?

Current students and staff can borrow up to four DVDs at once for a week at a time. We’re open for most of the summer so why not take advantage and try out some of the great DVDs the library has to offer – you might just be surprised by what you find!

Oliver’s Choice: Cosi Fan Tutte

Librarian Oliver Witkin has chosen to display in the library small exhibition cabinet a facsimile reproduction of Mozart’s original manuscript score for Cosi fan Tutte, one of a number of facsimiles of Mozart’s late operas which are held in the Jerwood Library’s reference collection. These facsimiles offer a unique insight into Mozart’s working methods [REFERENCE FACSIMILE COLLECTION: MOZ]


Conventional wisdom in respect of this opera has been kinder to Mozart than it has to his librettist, Da Ponte. Cosi fan Tutte, the third and final collaboration between the two and the only one which is not based on a singular literary source, has historically been perceived as an opera of sublime music that is, to a greater or lesser extent, spoiled by its libretto.photo of library exhibition case

While not much is known about the earliest performances of Cosi fan Tutte following its premiere in 1790, the notion that its libretto is frivolous and even immoral was widespread throughout the 19th century and into the early years of the 20th. A number of eminent figures such as Beethoven and Wagner joined the chorus of disapproval. Performances were heavily revised and edited to appease the sensibilities of the times and it was only towards the middle of the 20th century that the opera found a much surer footing in the concert repertoire in its original and unexpurgated form.

While few people today would object to the play on moral grounds, even for a modern audience the relationship between the music and libretto seems puzzling. Mozart’s joyful but occasionally dark and melancholy music appears as the backdrop to a seemingly trivial comedy. This raises certain questions as to the intent of both composer and librettist. If there is a mystery here, it is not one which we can resolve by looking back at contemporaneous accounts of the opera – which might offer some clues as to how the work was conceived – they simply don’t exist.

The theme of the opera concerns the lovers’ expectations of sexual fidelity. The experiment, set up as a play within a play. is designed to test the truth value of this moral order and to reveal the true character of human nature. Behind it, one can sense the growing insecurity of the moral order in the modern world. This is perhaps reflected in some of the sadness that can be discerned in Mozart’s music. What appears, then, to be a trivial story, at odds with the music, is in fact a much more significant drama which is illuminated by it. Irony runs throughout the whole of this work. People are not what they appear to be in the eyes of others.

There is yet another aspect of the play; this concerns the relationship between men and women. It could be argued that there is something peculiarly modern about this, too. Women are shown to have passions and desires which are comparable with men, undermining the prevalent attitudes towards relations between the sexes in the society of Mozart and Da Ponte’s time. The audience is led, through a gentle comedy, to consider these aspects of a changing world.

It’s possible to see this opera as existing on more than one level. You can take it at face value and appreciate it as a light-hearted comedy, or you can look beneath the surface at the way in which it subtly challenges and undermines the moral certainties of the traditional order.

 

Chuck Berry

1926-2017

It was with great sadness that I heard of the death of singer, guitarist, songwriter and general rock ‘n’ roll legend, Chuck Berry. For anyone interested in pop, rock ‘n’ roll, American culture, song-writing and guitar playing Chuck Berry was a seminal figure.

He started playing rhythm and blues, i.e. music made by and aimed at black people, and perhaps his most important contribution was the realisation that by combining the story-telling traditions of American country & western and folk music (music associated with white America) with the sexual energy and drive of rhythm and blues he could produce a music that would transcend America’s fairly entrenched racial divide.

Photograph of Chuck Berry

Of course that realisation would not have amounted to much if he was not then able to produce the most entertaining and inventive insights into American life, considered so perceptive by the designers of NASA’s Voyager mission that they included a recording of his song Johnny B Goode on a record designed to communicate something of Earth’s culture to any (record player-owning) aliens encountered along the way.

There was a great deal of warmth and affection in the atmosphere created in his songs – completely at odds, it seems, from the personality of the man. In this lovely couplet from Memphis Tennessee  you also see his inventiveness with words and phrases, here substituting hurry-home drops for tears:

Last time I saw Marie she’s waving me good-bye
With hurry-home drops on her cheeks, that trickled from her eye

He also more or less defined the way electric guitar should be played in pop/rock music: the catchy guitar lick introducing the song (later brilliantly adapted by the Rolling Stones and others); the style of thickening the sound of electric guitar by playing two strings at once for his leads and solos which enabled him to maintain a rhythmic drive in his solos that was quite new. This way of playing was a huge influence on later players such as Jimi Hendrix and can be heard brilliantly on the afore-mentioned Johnny B Goode; which is, for all we know, being enjoyed at this moment at a party on OGLE-TR-56b.

Chuck Berry; 18 October 1926 – 18 March 2017. Rest in peace.

Chuck Berry in the Jerwood Library:
We only have one CD in our collection but it gives a very good overview:
The Blues Collection, (Orbis, 1993) which can be found in the Blues CD section: BLUES:BER

We also have his autobiography which recounts the development of the music and other aspects of his life (including a couple of spells in prison) in his inimitable and very readable style:
Chuck Berry: The Autobiography (New York, Fireside, 1988); classmark: 786.91 BER

Photo Credit: flutnace Flickr via Compfight cc

Helen’s choice…New Orleans, birthplace of jazz

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The Old Jelly Rollers in New Orleans (photo used with permission)

Inspired by the success story of Trinity Laban’s student group Old Jelly Rollers heading off to New Orleans during CoLab, and vocalist Cherise Adams-Burnett, winning seats on the British Airways VIP party flight celebrating the airline’s new route, synchronising with our excellent volunteer Genia Browning completing yet another large chunk of indexing work on the Dan Pawson collection, it seemed a good moment to showcase some of the New Orleans music items held here in the Jerwood Library.

The items in the small display cabinet refer to the ‘birthplace of jazz’ and also show the range of materials in Dan Pawson’s collection some of which featured in a Jerwood Library exhibition of jazz materials mounted in 2013.

Was New Orleans the birthplace of jazz?  The New Orleans Official Guide Online (1) states:

“Some will say that Jazz was born in 1895, when Buddy Bolden started his first band. Others will say 1917, when Nick LaRocca and his Original Dixieland Jazz Band recorded the first Jazz record, Livery Stable Blues. However, Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton also said, “It is evidently known, beyond contradiction, that New Orleans is the cradle of Jazz, and I myself happen to be the inventor in the year 1902”.

Collier (2) acknowledges that despite various claims that jazz arose in in other places in America, most give New Orleans as its birthplace. He doubts that Buddy Bolden was the originator, as contemporary reports describe his music as a blues-tinged mix of ragtime and popular songs. Collier suggests that a groups of ‘Creoles of color’ played a significant role, with their music having ‘a rhythmic snap akin to the “swing” of jazz.’

Whether it was Buddy Bolden, “Jelly Roll” Morton or the Creole band, New Orleans seems to be the place where it all happened.

The selected recordings in the cabinet feature, in particular, some recordings by cornet player Nick LaRocca, born 11th April 1889 in New Orleans and died 22nd Feb 1961 in New Orleans. Writing in the Grove Dictionary of Jazz,  Sudhalter (3) suggests

“It is beyond dispute that LaRocca’s energy and ambition were the driving force behind the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. His style impressed Bix Beiderbecke, who became a lifelong admirer, and the steady drive and rhythmic freedom of LaRocca’s playing on the band’s recordings of 1936 demonstrate this affinity. LaRocca also co-wrote such standards as At the Jazz Band Ball and Clarinet Marmalade”.

The author of the New Orleans website (1) also notes that “it’s both possible and probable that Nick LaRocca heard, and was influenced by Buddy Bolden, who had the most popular black band at the turn of the century.”

The library has some of LaRocca’s recordings, for example the Original Dixieland jazz band : jazz originators Vol.4 (re-issues by Jazz Collector, JEL21 of recordings made in ca.1918/1919), First jazz recording 1917: the Original Dixieland Jazz Band (issued by Philips, BBE 12488), and the CD re-issue entitled New Orleans: Where Jazz was born (issued by Jazz Roots, CD 56021) [this last has been loaded into the juke box in the North Library for quick listening].

Collier (2) notes that “the  Original Dixieland Jazz Band was an enormous success, and its February 1917 recordings for Victor were the first jazz recordings. These became hits, and by the end of 1917 jazz was becoming a nationwide phenomenon with a large, primarily white, audience”.

Finally on the display shelves in the library there are related vinyl LPs (library listening only), and loanable CDs and books on the New Orleans topic, other LaRocca-related LPs, and of course, thanks to  Genia’s hard work, a catalogue search will reveal still more of the library’s resources.

_______________________________________________________________

(1) New Orleans Official Guide online: http://www.neworleansonline.com/neworleans/music/musichistory/jazzbirthplace.html.

(2) James Lincoln Collier. “Jazz (i).” The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, 2nd ed.. Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Oxford University Press, accessed February 28, 2017, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/J223800.

(3) Richard M. Sudhalter. “LaRocca, Nick.” The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, accessed February 27, 2017, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/subscriber/article/grove/music/J259200.