Library News for Keyboard Department


Claude Debussy’s Anniversary

Claude Debussy died 100 years ago on 25th March 1918 and to mark the occasion Trinity Laban has a whole festival of free concerts entitled Debussy and Beyond’:
Search the events here.

The Jerwood Library has an extensive collection of Debussy’s music, audio-visual material and books. Of particular note is the Durand Collected Edition of his Complete Works (Jerwood Library Collected Editions) and The Pierpont Morgan Library reproduction of Debussy’s autograph score to the Preludes Book 1 (Jerwood Library Facsimile Collection).

Don’t forget that we also have access to further materials via our various Online Resources, notably Alexander Street Press which has scores and recordings.

 


Alexander Street Scores now on Catalogue

We have recently integrated into our library catalogue over 10,000 scores from the online resource Alexander Street. They’ll now appear alongside regular search results, and can be filtered by using the new ‘Digital Score’ option from the catalogue item type drop-down menu.

 

 


Walter Recommends:

The Agony of Modern Music by Henry Pleasants

Have you ever wondered why you and everyone you know seems to dislike modern music? Ever felt that you must be very stupid not to understand the tortured meanderings of the mind of the contemporary composer? This book is for you.

Critic (and Cold-War spy) Henry Pleasants articulates brilliantly what many people have intuitively understood for a long time: i.e. that most contemporary music is entirely devoid of vitality, and – not unconnected – entirely lacking an audience (outside of a tiny clique of academics, fellow professionals and, well, students).

Anyone interested in music will find plenty here to agree and disagree with, but the book is well argued and cannot be ignored. Those involved in contemporary music need to deal with the issues Pleasants lays out.

The Agony of Modern Music by Henry Pleasants
Simon and Schuster, 1955
shelf-mark: 788.08 PLE

other books in the Jerwood Library by the same author:
Opera In Crisis: Tradition, Present, Future
Thames and Hudson, 1989
shelf-mark: 784.8 PLE

The Great Singers: from the dawn of opera to our own time
Simon and Schuster, 1966
shelf-mark: 784.19 PLE

Search the Jerwood Library Online Catalogue here.

 



 

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Library E-Resources: Alexander Street

This series of blog posts intends to highlight a particular online resource from time to time in order to give students and staff a better idea of what kinds of useful things are available via the library.

This month I’ve decided to draw attention to Alexander Street. To access Alexander Street, along with all of our other online resources, head to Moodle, find the ‘Library Links’ drop-down menu on the home page and select ‘Online Resources’.

What is Alexander Street?

Alexander Street is an electronic database containing an enormous number of scores, audio recordings, videos and text resources. There’s a whole range of great things to explore on their site, covering practically every type of music, so I would recommend having a browse around the topics of most interest to you. In particular, there are lots of digital scores, many of which are still in copyright and so not accessible via IMSLP. Similarly with recordings and videos – there’s plenty of things here you won’t find on Youtube or Spotify.

How can I use it?

If you use Quicksearch (accessible via Moodle or the library catalogue page), the results you’ll get will potentially include things which are on Alexander Street. However, something I would recommend is simply browsing the AS site directly. They have a huge range of fascinating resources that you wouldn’t necessarily think of searching for specifically; things like masterclasses, historic performances and lots of excellent documentaries about music.

Once you’re on the AS homepage, the ‘My Collections’ drop-down menu shows a complete list of their resources to which we have subscribed. These can then be browsed individually. A particular favourite of mine is the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. This is an amazing resources for anyone interested in the world’s diverse musical practices, with a huge volume dedicated to each continent. Other great resources include ‘Opera in Video’ and the ‘Jazz Music Library’, to name just two. There’s something on there for everyone – take a look!

Please note that there are licensing restrictions for using the digital scores from Alexander Street. They have told us that they can be printed and used for study or in-class use (including rehearsals) but must not be used for any performance that is open to the public, even if no entry fee is charged.

If you’re on site at Trinity Laban, access Alexander Street here
Or if you’re at home, access Alexander Street here

Claire’s Choice: on an autumnal theme!

conkers

As the mornings grow colder and squirrels are to be seen hoarding conkers for the winter, what better for “Claire’s Choice” than to highlight two songs in the Jerwood Library collection celebrating the venerable chestnut tree.

village-blacksmith

 

Written in 1840 by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the poem The Village Blacksmith was set to music in 1854 by the English composer and celebrated bass singer Willoughby Weiss. It starts “Under a spreading chestnut tree the village smithy stands…” and continues to describe the blacksmith’s daily life. Weiss offered the copyright of the work to a firm of publishers for the sum of 5 pounds, but when his offer was turned down, he decided to publish it on his own account. As luck would have it, it went on to become a hugely popular Victorian parlour song, earning him and his family a considerable income!

 

Moving forward into the 20th century, the second song The Chestnut Tree, with words and music by Jimmy Kennedy, Tommie Connor and Hamilton Kennedy, was composed in 1938. This popular novelty song was also inspired by Longfellow’s The Village Blacksmith. However rather than focussing on the virtuous, hard-working, church-going, qualities of the blacksmith, it centres on the blacksmith’s daughter and “the spreading chestnut tree”, the goings-on under which certainly didn’t appear in Longfellow’s poem!

But this was only one aspect of the song. In fact, the writers had been specifically commissioned to come up with something that was going to take dance halls by storm. Indeed the inspiration behind selecting The Village Blacksmith as inspiration came from a photograph of King George VI at a boy scout jamboree in which his, and all the scouts’, hands were held to their heads. Further research unearthed that this was part of a performance in which the scouts recited The Village Blacksmith. With assistance from Adele England (who had choreographed The Lambeth Walk) they devised some steps to go with their song, which are illustrated in the printed edition. It became a huge hit, selling over 10,000 copies per day.

This edition comes from the Jerwood Library’s Rita Williams popular song collection. Rita Williams sang with the Billy Cotton Club, among other groups, and was an avid collector of popular songs. The overall collection comprises some 3000 individual songs dating from Victorian times to the 1970s. It is handlisted here. Do get in touch with us if you’d like to see any other hidden gems in the collection.

Items from the Jerwood library collection:

Weiss, W.H. “The Village Blacksmith”. In The Songs of England, volume 1, edited by J.L. Hatton, 245-249. London: Boosey & Co, 1910

Kennedy, Jimmy, Tommie Connor and Hamilton Kenny, The Chestnut Tree. London: Peter Maurice Music Co, 1938

Exhibition: Experimental Scores from 1950s New York

cabinet-2One of the things that strikes me about the music of John Cage, Morton Feldman, Christian Wolff and Earle Brown in the 1950s is how uneasily it might sit in the library of a conservatoire of music. It represents attitudes to sound, composition and value-judgements like skill, quality, or success and failure which seem to me to be at odds with those of the mainstream of western classical music history. And this seemed to me a good reason to drag it out and examine it under the lights of the library display cabinets.

But first things first – why does this music tend to be grouped together and described as ‘experimental’? Attempts at naming and defining a musical movement seem to me to be doomed to exceptions and over-simplifications, intended as they are to take in the work done by a range of different personalities over a vaguely-defined period of time. Yet, they have their uses. Something new really did seem to happen in the way people were creating and thinking about music in New York City, beginning in the 1950s, and calling this new music ‘experimental’ seems reasonable. At least, John Cage seemed to think so:

“The word ‘experimental’ is apt, providing it is understood not as descriptive of an act to be later judged in terms of success and failure, but simply as of an act the outcome of which is unknown.”  [written in 1955][1]

Cage is the composer most associated with the inception of this new music, but the work of all four men has a further attitude in common; they were all writing music which was at one remove from the person who made it, and thus somewhat distanced from their own tastes and prejudices in favour of a more objective approach to sound. Michael Nyman, in his book on experimental music, also adds that it is music which is somehow distinct from the ‘well-trodden but sanctified path of the post-Renaissance tradition’ of avant-garde composers such as Boulez, Xenakis, Kagel, Berio, Stockhausen, Birtwistle, Bussotti.[2] I’ll come back to that.

John Cage’s famous ‘silent’ piece 4’33’’ was composed and premiered in 1952 and is often the place to start off any discussion about experimental music. Consequently, I almost cringe talking about this piece. It seems to have been picked over again and again, endlessly. However, one of the reasons this is the case is that it’s just such a good example in the way in encapsulates many aspects of the new attitude towards music that began to emerge in the work of a number of composers around the same time in the same place.

cage

John Cage at a drinks reception at the Cage/Cunningham Residency at the Laban Centre, July 1980.  Photo by Peter Sayers (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Cage’s piece grew directly out of his realisation that sounds surround us always, even in the quietest of places, and if we attend to them, and accept both intended and unintended sounds into composition, a new attitude to making and listening to music is born – ‘Happy new ears!’, as he put it.[3] His move was to simply provide a time-frame (the duration of which was generated by chance) in which an audience could attend to all the sounds that surround them. And although 4’33’’ is the idea taken to its logical extreme, the emphasis in this new attitude was not the traditional one of prescribing a defined time-object, the materials and structuring of which were calculated and specified in advance. Instead, these composers were more interested in outlining a certain situation in which sounds then occur. It was an attitude of acceptance rather than craftsmanship; an effort to distance one’s self from the composition; and an attempt to bring art and life closer together:[4]

“When a composer feels a responsibility to make, rather than accept, he eliminates from the area of possibility all those events that do not suggest at that point in time vogue of profundity. For he takes himself seriously, wishes to be considered great, and he thereby diminishes his love and increases his fear and concern about what people will think.

 

There are many serious problems confronting such an individual. He must do it better, more impressively, more beautifully, etc. than anybody else. And what, precisely, does this, this beautiful profound object, this masterpiece, have to do with Life? It has this to do with Life: that it is separate from it. Now we see it and now we don’t. When we see it we feel better, and when we are away from it, we don’t feel so good. Life seems shabby and chaotic and disordered, ugly in contrast.”[5]

Describing pieces like the graph pieces of Morton Feldman, in which only the number and relative placement of pitches (high, middle, low) are specified within a time-grid, Cage said that ‘the composer resembles the maker of a camera who allows someone else to take the picture.’[6]

“What is, or seems to be, new in this music? One finds a concern for a kind of objectivity, almost anonymity – sound come into its own. The ‘music’ is resultant existing simply in the sounds we hear, given no impulse by expression of self or personality” [7]

It should already seem quite clear how this attitude is very different from that of the European-classical canon, including the work of the avant-garde at the time. In that tradition the responsibility for managing and calculating all of the musical parameters is laid squarely at the feet of the composer. The emphasis there is on integration, organisation and control as opposed to the impersonal techniques used for merely ‘setting sounds in motion’, in which any possibility of drawing events into some kind of pre-calculated image is impossible because so much is left open until the moment of performance. And indeed, it was the uniqueness of the moment, rather than the uniqueness of something preserved, that interested the experimental composers.

So this brings me to the place experimental music might occupy in a conservatoire of music. After all, it’s here that performance students come to hone an extraordinarily refined skill-set over a period of at least 4 years, with the emphasis being on replicating certain unique and preserved master-pieces. It’s hard-work, and success and failure are very real categories. So it seems understandable that the presence of this different attitude to music-making might sit a little uneasily here – who needs a degree when all you’re doing is ‘projecting sounds in time’? How do you accurately rate the performance of a piece that sounds completely different every time it’s performed?

However, my feeling, for what it’s worth, is that music is not just one thing, and students should be able, if so inclined, to take advantage of their time here to explore it in all its variety. Surely, this is one of the main things the library is here to facilitate. Whether this music seems exciting to one person or empty to another depends ultimately on their temperament, but either way, having it in the collection increases its scope. After all, let’s not forget that this music is hardly ‘new’. In fact, it’s now just about old enough to qualify for a free bus pass.

It’s refreshing that people tend to find the arch-modernist style-police amusing for the vitriol with which they denounced anyone who didn’t plow their particular furrow in the mid-twentieth-century, and this opening-up and moving away from an unhealthy obsession with style can only be a good thing. I know that when I learnt about what was happening in 1950s New York for the first time it opened my ears to new ways of thinking about and listening to music. It didn’t stop me practicing my scales, but it did give me a different take on listening to all the sounds that we normally do our best to ignore; or wondering whether we can, or why we might want to, remove our tastes and prejudices from the things we make. Being exposed to a diversity of values and approaches to music only enriches things.

However, as a final thought, I’ll leave Morton Feldman to muddy the waters. For all this talk of a diversity of approaches, perhaps this supposedly brand-new attitude wasn’t really all that separate from the mainstream avant-garde after all? It seems a good example of how parts of a culture that seem unconnected at the time, when seen in perspective can shed light on each other in interesting ways. All the more reason to welcome this kind of music into the conservatoire library, I’d say.

“What rhapsodizes in today’s ‘cool’ language is its own construction. The fact that men like Boulez and Cage represent opposite extremes of modern mythology is not what is interesting. What is interesting is their similarity. In the music of both men, things are exactly what they are  – no more, no less. In the music of both men, what is heard is indistinguishable from its process. In fact, process itself might be called the zeitgeist of our age.”[8]

 


 

[1] John Cage, Silence (London: Marion Boyars, 1978), 13

[2] Michael Nyman, Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 1

[3] John Cage, A Year From Monday: Lectures and Writings (Marion Boyars: London, 1968), 30

[4] Michael Nyman, Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 4

[5] John Cage, Silence (London: Marion Boyars, 1978), 130

[6] John Cage, Silence (London: Marion Boyars, 1978), 11

[7] Christian Wolff, quoted in Michael Nyman, Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 30

[8] Morton Feldman, Give my Regards to Eighth Street: Collected Writings of Morton Feldman ed. B.H.Friedman (Cambridge, MA: Exact Change, 2000), 109

New music for singers

The third phase of the library’s printed music strategy got underway this year. Having built up our collection of jazz, full scores, and opera, it was time to focus our attention on solo songs and collections. Look out for new works by contemporary composers such as Michael Finnissy, Giacinto Scelsi, Robin Holloway, Thomas Ades, Piers Hellawell, Tansy Davies, Roxanna Panufnik, Joanna Lee, Lynne Plowman, and Sally Beamish, as well as new additions from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and modern repertoires.

This year we are looking to develop our collection of music for violinists (solo music and accompanied), so if you have any recommendations please let us know. Requests for specific pieces – in any category – can be made by completing a purchase request form, available at the enquiry desk or on Moodle.

The library’s most recent printed music acquisitions are listed here, please keep checking for updates!

Cover images are reproduced with the kind permission of Boosey & Hawkes and Hal Leonard.

Wind, Brass and Percussion Music in Special Collections

Today we have a post aimed at encouraging wind, brass and percussion players to make more of our special collections. Whilst it’s true that much of the collections comprise voice and string-based repertoire, this is by no means exclusively the case. So, here are some choice picks to help you explore further (NB non-WBP players may also find something of interest here!).

Printed music

The Bridge Memorial Library (the historic library of the former Trinity College of Music) is full of rare and unusual printed music from the classical and romantic periods.

Reissiger

Carl Reissiger’s Vier Gesänge for soprano, horn and piano 780.3 REI

Of relevance here, there are several out-of-print works of chamber music involving wind or brass instruments. For instance, we have a set of quartets by C. F. Baumgarten for oboe and strings – we featured them a few years ago in this blog post here. Then there is Henri Brod’s Cinquième Fantaisie for piano, oboe and bassoon. Or how about Reissiger’s Vier Gesänge for soprano, horn and piano.

bound volume

Nineteenth-century volume of clarinet trios including Heinrich Lannoy, Grosses Trio für Pianoforte, Clarinett und Violoncello 782.7029 LAN

Clarinettists may want to delve into this volume of trios, originally for various different instrument combinations but bound together clearly with the intention of being played by a clarinet trio. It even includes some manuscript arrangements for the clarinet part – a great insight into nineteenth-century performance practice.

We also hold first or early editions of better-known works, useful for comparing with performance directions in later editions. For instance, see this 1820s edition of Spohr’s Octet.

Manuscript music

As well as rare printed music we also hold many unique manuscript scores of works written for wind, brass or percussion instruments.

Several of these can be found in our Carey Blyton collection which came to us in 2006. Blyton was a former TL student and professor, and a prolific composer. Relevant items include a brass quintet, woodwind trio and song cycle for voice, clarinet, horn and piano.

Another manuscript by one of our former composition professors is Arnold Cooke’s autograph score of Divertimento for flute, oboe, violin, cello and piano (or harpsichord). Cooke taught at the conservatoire between 1947 and 1978.

Lastly, so as not to neglect our percussionists, there are the three autograph manuscript scores by Simon Bainbridge, David Bedford, and John Woolrich which together comprise Songs, Sketches and Tall Stories, a work for narrator, clarinet, piano and percussion. This was composed for a schools music theatre project at Blackheath Concert Halls (now owned by Trinity Laban) in March 1989.

Accessing the collections

If you’d like to discover more, all our special collections are described here on our website. And many collections are catalogued at item level on our catalogue.

When you’ve found something you’d like to see, please contact us to make an appointment so we can have the material ready for you. Our special collections are available to all researchers, whether members of Trinity Laban or not. Please note that copies can only be made in compliance with copyright law – we can advise on specific items.

Item of the month, November 2015: Handel – Acis and Galatea

Handel composed what has been described variously as as a serenata, a masque, a pastoral and a pastoral opera, whilst living in North West London in the early eighteenth century. First performed in 1721, Acis and Galatea went on to become by far the most widely performed of his dramatic works and has since been adapted many times.

Acis and Galatea

Acis and Galatea (Jardin du Luxembourg, Médicis Fountain, Paris). Sculptor, Auguste Ottin. Photo by Wally Gobetz shared under Creative Commons licence, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic.

We are fortunate to have some early editions of Acis and Galatea in the Bridge Collection, one of our special collections, here in the Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts. The score featured in this month’s exhibition was published in London around 1788. It forms part of the very first attempt at a collected edition of Handel’s works by Dr Samuel Arnold (1740-1802).
Acis and Galatea

Acis and Galatea : a serenata composed for the Duke of Chandos in the year 1720 by George Frederic Handel. Published in London c. 1788

The Bridge Collection is the historical library of Trinity College of Music and consists of over 1,000 volumes, mainly of printed music. In order to search for an item in the Bridge Collection, using the catalogue, change the ‘location’ to ‘Bridge Collection’ and either simply hit ‘search’ or enter some further search terms.

Trinity Laban staff and students can use QuickSearch to search for additional online information (use the filters on the left hand side of the page to limit results to recordings, videos, scores, articles, reviews etc.) All you need to log in is your usual Trinity Laban username and password. If you have any questions about using QuickSearch then please just ask in the library.

You can see a specially-reduced production of Handel’s Acis and Galatea performed by Trinity Laban student-led opera company ‘Puzzle Piece Opera’ on Friday 20th November at 1pm at Charlton House.

In the meantime you can listen to Acis and Galatea performed by The English Consort, with the Choir of the English Consort, conducted by Trevor Pinnock, at the wall mounted listening station at the far end of the North Library.

New image collection: Photographic Youth Music & Culture Archive

Photo of a happy waving crowd silhouetted against a blue sky.

Photo by Naki, from the PYMCA collection.

Trinity Laban now has an educational licence to the Photographic Youth Music & Culture Archive collection of images. PYMCA Education offers a reference archive of over 35000 images relating to modern (1940 onwards) social history and youth culture. It also includes written material on this subject, and a curated collection of links to other websites on youth culture organised by time period and by subculture.

How do I access the collection?

  1. Go to www.pymca.com.
  2. Click the Education tab, then the ‘Login via your home institution’ button.
  3. Choose Trinity Laban from the list of institutions, then enter your Trinity Laban login details if prompted.
  4. Now use the search box on the Education page to find images described with the keywords you enter. For search tips, see PYMCA’s own FAQs.
  5. Once you’re viewing an image, use the small save icon at the bottom-right to download the image.

PYMCA save icon

What can I use the images for?

According to PYMCA’s FAQ, “All images can be used for Educational and Editorial use and do not require a release. However for commercial advertising purposes images must be released or be ‘No Release Required'”.

Therefore it’s fine to use images as part of your teaching or coursework at Trinity Laban – remember to attribute PYMCA and the photographer (who is listed on the image preview page)!

Our educational access only allows downloads of a limited number of low-res images per year (500px maximum length/width) but this size is fine for online use and printing in small sizes, such as part of an assignment or handout.